New publications by Article 36 examine the ways in which developments in certain weapon technologies can present particular legal and policy concerns.

Photo credit: Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (https://flic.kr/p/6KhCM4)

Photo credit: Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (https://flic.kr/p/6KhCM4)

In a series of papers released over 2018, Article 36 sets out why consideration of developments in science and technology is important in the context of multilateral legal and policy discussions on weapons, methods and means of warfare, and suggests the need for a framework that can help to ensure that legal and policy considerations keep pace with changes in technology.

The continuous process of development in science and technology (S&T) may raise concerns regarding human well-being, environmental protection and international peace and security, which may, in turn, provoke new questions regarding the application and sufficiency of existing legal frameworks. New and changing military technologies can present significant risks to life and precipitate dramatic changes in the balance of international relations.

In an overview paper, Article 36 points to the need for early consideration of developments in S&T at the multilateral level and a framework for the identification of risks. In three shorter papers, Article 36 examines particular areas of technological development – nanoweapons, directed energy weapons and acoustic weapons – and asks what risks they pose and how they might be regulated.

Download the papers


Science, technology and weaponization: preliminary observations
Briefing Paper
November 2017

 


Nanoweapons
Briefing Paper
November 2017

 


Directed Energy Weapons
Briefing Paper
November 2017

 


Acoustic Weapons
Briefing Paper
November 2018

Posted in: Acoustic weapons, CCW, Directed energy weapons, Nanoweapons, New weapon technologies, S&T in the context of disarmament,