Humanitarian consequences: short case study of the direct humanitarian impacts from a single nuclear weapon detonation on Manchester, UK

Humanitarian consequences: short case study of the direct humanitarian impacts from a single nuclear weapon detonation on Manchester, UK

MEDIA ADVISORY

London, Friday 22 February

New research highlights consequences of nuclear weapon use

A new report analysing the expected consequences of an attack on Manchester with a nuclear weapon will be launched in parliament on Tuesday 26 February by UK NGO Article 36. The report has been written by Article 36, in cooperation with Scientists for Global Responsibility. It is part of a series of new UK-focused studies on the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons that are being produced by members of the UK arm of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

These reports will be released in advance of a major international conference hosted by the government of Norway on 4-5 March to consider the humanitarian consequences of the use of nuclear weapons. So far 120 countries have registered to attend, including national authorities responsible for humanitarian response to the impact of a nuclear weapon detonation. The UK has not officially confirmed whether it will participate in Oslo.

Immediately preceding this conference, Oslo will also see the largest gathering of civil society on nuclear weapons in recent years, with over 700 participants from around 90 countries registered to attend a civil society forum hosted by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons and aiming to develop a common strategy towards a new international treaty prohibiting nuclear weapons.

The reports will be launched at an event in Committee Room 5 in Parliament at 5:30pm on Tuesday 26 February, hosted by former Minister for the Armed Forces, Nick Harvey MP.

Background

The humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons have not been systematically discussed since end of Cold War. Recently there has been an increased focus on this aspect of nuclear weapons, illustrated in 2010 by all parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty acknowledging the “catastrophic humanitarian consequences” of the use of nuclear weapons.

President Obama noted in his 2009 Prague speech that: “One nuclear weapon exploded in one city — be it New York or Moscow, Islamabad or Mumbai, Tokyo or Tel Aviv, Paris or Prague — could kill hundreds of thousands of people. And no matter where it happens, there is no end to what the consequences might be — for our global safety, our security, our society, our economy, to our ultimate survival.”

Article 36 is a UK-based NGO established in 2011 to undertake research and advocacy on the humanitarian impact of certain types of weapons and methods of warfare. Article 36 is a member of ICAN UK and serves on the leadership body of ICAN internationally.

Contact

For advance copies of the report or more information please contact Thomas Nash on: +44 (0) 7711926730 thomas@article36.org www.article36.org

Posted in: Nuclear weapons,
Tagged: