Over the last ten years, the pattern of harm from the use of explosive weapons in populated areas has become a central humanitarian policy concern. Relentless bombardment of towns and cities, and the resulting humanitarian crises, has highlighted the need for action at all levels – from the operational to the international – to better protect civilian populations from the deadly and destructive effects of explosive weapons.

People stand on rubble of damaged buildings after an airstrike in the besieged town of Hamoria, Eastern Ghouta, in Damascus, Syria Janauary 9, 2018. REUTERS/Bassam Khabieh - RC1A03C21970

People stand on rubble of damaged buildings after an airstrike in the besieged town of Hamoria, Eastern Ghouta, in Damascus, Syria Janauary 9, 2018. REUTERS/Bassam Khabieh

Article 36 has published a new report that brings together the central themes of the policy discussion around the use of explosive weapons in populated areas.

It considers the physical features of explosive weapons – which are central to how their use causes harm – and it looks at the characteristics of that harm, from the direct and immediate effects on people to the wider societal costs.

The second half of the report considers the mechanisms available to limit or prevent such harm in the future, including international humanitarian law, operational policies and procedures, and broader political efforts – and sets out pathways towards stronger civilian protection.

Download this report

Explosive weapons: Protecting civilians from the use of explosive weapons in populated areas

Report
September 2018

Posted in: Explosive weapons,